#Sale++ Freud 76 106 38 Inch Diameter 2 Flute Down Spiral

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Top Freud 76-106 3/8-Inch Diameter 2-Flute Down Spiral Router Bit with 1/2-Inch Shank Pros Cons
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Features

  • Kickback reducing design
  • Individually computer balanced
  • Precision ground for the smoothest cuts
  • Covered by Freud's limited lifetime warranty
Freud 76-106 3/8-Inch Diameter 2-Flute Down Spiral Router Bit with 1/2-Inch Shank Pros Cons Features is fabulous!

Description

Freud's solid carbide down spiral bits are ideal for chip free routing where chip removal is not a problem. Excellent for through cutting of material with a table mounted router or a pin router. Eliminates chipping when working with veneers or laminated m

Buyer Reviews

This review is for upward spiral bits, but the same information applies for a downward spiral bit. Downward spiral bits are designed especially for work where you want to go completely through the material.
This review is going to sound funny from someone who broke two 1/4" shaft 1/4" upward spiral bits. In plain words, I wouldn't be without them. As a matter of fact I am adding a 3/8" to my 1/4" and 1/2" bits. When people use the phrase the "break in period" take that literally when you use spiral bits. The problem is that it is not designed for freehand use. If you plunge it deep and try to freehand it into some wood, the edges can grab and instantly create a ricocheting effect, which will whip into an instant frenzy and snap the bit. These bits are designed to be used in a table, with a fence guiding the work against the bit, or in a jig to make mortises for example. They are ideal for use with a plunge router with a three step adjustable turret. Also great with a regular hand held, with successive depth adjustments. Fully burying the bit and going for it is not advisable even in a table.
Another consideration is although these bits are solid carbide, I doubt they are the same grade in hardness of the standard double flute straight bits with welded on tips, that are so popular. So they shouldn't last as long.
So after all of that, why buy an upward spiral bit? Simply this: If your creating a pocket, like a mortise, even though you are doing it in successively deeper passes, it will create a perfectly smooth surface, both on the walls, and the bottom of the pocket. If you are creating an opening all the way through your work piece, it will create a perfectly smooth wall.
When making mortises, it is possible, with dial caliper level measuring, to make a mortise so perfect that you almost don't need glue. You may want to for example use doweled pegs only to hold the joint. If you were doing heirloom antique level joinery with no metal hardware, such a joint would be beneficial. What is often done is the mortise is made with a machine or fixture with a chisel and drill bit at the core, making a pocket that is uneven in its edges, and even more so at the base. You may say who cares, I use urethane glues, which foam up to fill the gaps, and that would be a valid argument. What this spiral bit gives you is the option of building a jig that will fit a range of wood sizes that will give you instant mortises that are perfect, with less time, less effort, and perfectly made, and a lot less expensive than a dedicated machine. Wood mating surfaces can be done to perfection, instead of the standard glue up, and then having to sand out the surface irregularities. I am not knocking mortise and tenon machines, they are great, and quickly usable, because mortise and tenon joints don't show so they don't need to be perfect aesthetically.
One other thing worth mentioning, is that it is a good idea to get upward spiral bits with the same size shaft as the head of the bit. For example a 1/2" shaft 1/2" bit, and a 1/4" shaft with a 1/4" bit. That way you can make very deep mortises that go beyond the depth of the bit surface. So why am I buying a 3/8" spiral bit as well? Because I needed a 3/8" slot in the face of a project and wanted to do it with the spiral bit that I didn't have.
I just made some custom router table fences, and I needed to make a 1/4" slot along the backing board of the fence. I wanted it to be even and smooth and look great without any tear out on the edges, so I used the 1/4" spiral bit. Now I have exposed slots that are perfect. That is what a spiral bit does.
I have routers made by Porter Cable, Fein, Makita and several Bosch models, and each of them receives, both spiral bit size shafts of 1/4" and 1/2" effortlessly. They slide in without any play and do not bind on the way in or the way out. Knowing that router collets have a safety factor of needing a second tough release on unscrewing the collet is key. Additionally the Freud routers were having some problems with the bit fit, some say it is because they were being shipped with metric collets. Be that as it may, these spiral bits go into your router without any size-fit problems. I have never had a problem with any of the Freud router bits fitting into any one of my routers.
In conclusion, I would use the heck out of your standard carbide tipped double straight flute bits, and save these upward spiral bits for your exposed surfaces, or when you want a perfect surface-fit. Highly recommended, I wouldn't want to be without them.
***I have come back to add one more comment to this review. When I just said, "use the heck out of your standard carbide tipped straight double flute bits" I doubly advise you to do that. Even with the great results these upward spiral bits give you, I just broke my third 1/4"-1/4" shaft upward spiral bit. I have to conclude that the additional brittleness that an all carbide bit gives you, leads to an ease of breaking that you will not have with a standard bit. Of course the 3/8" and 1/2" with the 1/2" shaft are going to be a lot stronger, but I will be reserving my use of the 1/4" shaft upward spiral bit only for the most exposed surfaces. Read more ›
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#Sale++ Freud 76 106 38 Inch Diameter 2 Flute Down Spiral